Exploring the Teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan

Unit Overview

Created in Partnership with:

This Ontario Ministry of Education resource was prepared by teachers, for teachers in partnership with the Aga Khan Museum. Curriculum resources were inspired by the Museum’s Permanent Collection. Object information and images courtesy of the Aga Khan Museum.

Context

This unit is intended to provide Grade 7 and 8 students with a physical, cognitive and emotional connection to the Aga Khan Museum and a specific historical piece called the Planispheric Astrolabe which was created during a phase in history where many individuals from multiple faiths/religions worked harmoniously together. Furthermore, this unit will connect faiths with the teachings of the Indigenous Community through the interconnectedness and layering of Characteristic Traits and Values. Students will also have the opportunity to build community and appreciation for diversity within the classroom through exploration of dance and drama.

Summary

Dance

A1. Creating and Presenting: apply the creative process (see pages 19–22) to the composition of a variety of dance pieces, using the elements of dance to communicate feelings and ideas;

 

A2. Reflecting, Responding, and Analysing: apply the critical analysis process (see pages 23–28) to communicate their feelings, ideas, and understandings in response to a variety of dance pieces and experiences

 

Drama

B1. Creating and Presenting: apply the creative process (see pages 19–22) to process drama and the development of drama works, using the elements and conventions of drama to communicate feelings, ideas, and multiple perspectives;

 

B2. Reflecting, Responding, and Analysing: apply the critical analysis process (see pages 23–28) to communicate feelings, ideas, and understandings in response to a variety of drama works and experiences

Unit Guiding Questions

What is diversity?

What similarities can we draw between the Seven Sacred Teachings and the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan?

How can dance and drama be used to explore these issues?

How can we use dance and drama to communicate thinking?

 

Assessment and Evaluation

Assessment for Learning

Side-coaching, anecdotal notes, direct observation, descriptive feedback

Assessment as Learning

Co-constructing of criteria, reflection, self and peer feedback based on success criteria

Assessment of Learning

Final evaluation of drama and dance pieces based on co-constructed criteria

Lessons

Lesson 1 – The World through the Lens of an Astrolabe

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity to learn more about His Highness, the Aga Khan and the Aga Khan Museum. Students will be introduced to the Aga Khan Museum and a specific piece named the ‘Planispheric Astrolabe’. Students will also discuss the values instilled by the Aga Khan which will then be translated into movement.

Lesson 2 – Embodying the Astrolabe

In this lesson, the students will further build upon their knowledge of the astrolabe and will be given more historical information. They will explore the astrolabe and through story telling create movement pieces that tell the astrolabe’s journey. They will make connections to Indigenous Teachings (the seven sacred teachings): Wisdom, Love, Respect, Courage, Honesty, Humility, and Truth and the connection to the teachings of the Aga Khan: Tolerance, Acceptance, Strong Ethics/Morals, Compassion (helping the weak), Unity, Generosity, Forgiveness, Respect and the Pursuit of Enlightenment.

Lesson 3 – Exploring Diversity

This lesson hopes to solidify the importance of teaching character traits and how in a diverse society, these traits/teachings are the constant road to a better world. Furthermore, students will be given the opportunity to reflect upon diversity and create a short monologue. This monologue will then be integrated with their movement work from the previous lesson.

Lesson 1 – The World through the Lens of the Astrolabe

Lesson Overview

Estimated Time:  2-3 periods

Subject:  Grade 7 & 8

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity to learn more about His Highness the Aga Khan and the Aga Khan Museum. Students will be introduced to the Aga Khan Museum and a specific piece named the ‘Planispheric Astrolabe’. Students will also discuss the values instilled by the Aga Khan which will then be translated into movement.

Curriculum Expectations

Dance

A1. Creating and Presenting

A1.1: create dance pieces to represent or respond to specific rhythms and pieces of music (e.g., use the body, body parts, and the floor [stamping, stepping, body slapping] to replicate the rhythms in the music; transform a music imaging exercise into a dance interpretation)

A1.2: use dance as a language to communicate ideas from their own writing or media works (e.g., create a dance piece inspired by a student- authored poem about relationships with the natural world or by a student media work about divorce or loss)

Drama

B2. Reflecting, Responding and Analyzing

B2.1: construct personal interpretations of drama works, connecting drama issues and themes to social concerns at both the local and global level (e.g., create a web with the main idea of the drama in the centre and words describing personal and global connections leading out from the centre; explain in discussion or a journal entry why they disagree or empathize with the motivations of a character)

B2.2: evaluate, using drama terminology, how effectively drama works and shared drama experiences use the elements of drama to engage the audience and communicate a theme or message (e.g., determine whether the use of contrasting comic and serious scenes strengthened the impact of the theme or weakened it; determine whether using a historical setting enhanced the presentation of a contemporary theme)

Learning Goals

At the end of this lesson, students will:

  • use various dance strategies: Call & Response, Body Storming
  • explore the elements of dance including Body, Energy and Relationship
  • use dance and drama vocabulary
  • utilize various elements of drama through ‘posing’ and ‘tableau’ techniques
  • interpret and reflect upon the work of classmates
  • be familiar with His Highness the Aga Khan and the Aga Khan Museum
  • understand the importance of community and diversity within our global and local world
  • Instructional Components and Context

    Readiness

    Students should have prior experience exploring the elements of dance. Familiarity with bodystorming and choreographic tools would be an asset. Students should be familiar with tableau.

    Terminology

    Call and Response

    Improvisation

    Movement Vocabulary

    Gesture

    Tableau

    Unison

    Materials

    Projector/Screen/Computer with access to the internet

    Chart Paper/Markers/Tape

    Art supplies: scissors, markers, rulers etc.

    BLM #1: Astrolabe Think Sheet

    Appendix A: Elements of Dance

    BLM #2 Success Criteria for an Effective Group Tableau

    Lesson Plan

    Minds On

    Whole Class > Introduction of the Aga Khan

    As an introduction to the Aga Khan museum, show students the video “Exploring the Aga Khan Museum.” Post the following quote on the board/project it on the LCD projector.

    The aim of the Aga Khan Museum will be to offer unique insights and new perspectives into Islamic civilizations and the cultural threads that weave through history binding us all together. My hope is that the Museum will also be a centre of education and of learning, and that it will act as a catalyst for mutual understanding and tolerance.” -His Highness The Aga Khan

    Teacher Prompt: Why are museums important? What is the key motivation or goal of the Aga Khan Museum?

    Individual/Pairs/Whole Class > Exploring the Astrolabe

    Project an image of the astrolabe[BC1]  from the Aga Khan museum on the screen for students. Hand out copies of BLM# 1: Astrolabe Think Sheet and ask them to fill it in independently. Once they have had a chance to complete their ideas on their own, ask them to share their thinking with a partner and add/change/edit their ideas based on their discussion with their partner. Call the whole class back together for a discussion about the Astrolabe. Record student thinking on chart paper.

    Key Questions for Discussion

     

    • What could this object be?
    • What could it be used for?
    • Who may have used it?
    • What might it be made from?
    • Why might it have been created?

     

    Connections

    Differentiation:  Some students may prefer to complete BLM #1 Astrolabe Think Sheet orally or need someone to scribe for them.

    Assessment for learning: Understanding is checked through participation in activities. Reflection and insight communicated through being engaged in both class/group/individual activities. Anecdotal notes may be taken to document progress.

    Action!

    Individual > Build Your Own Astrolabe

    Explain to students that the Astrolabe has beginnings from all over the world, and has been created by different languages, produced by people across many faiths/religions, and used by everyone. See the “Connections” section for resources on building an astrolabe. Upon completion, students can place their own pieces of art on the wall or in a dedicated space in the classroom.

    Small Group/Whole Class > Ladder of Inference

    Show students the Ladder of Inference. Explain that it is a tool to assist us with understanding our thinking process. It also explains how we come to certain conclusions using our own mental processes. Put students in groups of 4-5. Ask students to consider: Why do you think the Planispheric Astrolabe was so important? and explain their thoughts on the importance of the Astrolabe by creating a Ladder of Inference on a large piece of chart paper. Remind students to refer back to items listed in BLM #1: Astrolabe Think Sheet regarding what they ‘See/Feel/Think/Wonder’.

    Bring the whole class back together for a follow up discussion on the Ladder of Inference.

    Key Concepts for Discussion:

    Ensure the following themes are touched upon in discussion on the Ladder of Inference.

     

    • Idea of slowing down conclusions
    • Making thinking explicit
    • Getting to the real conversation
    • Importance of students to be able to describe why they interpret the info as they did and show how different groups reach differing conclusions based on the information they select and how they interpret the selected data

     

    Whole Class > The Teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan

    Show the students one (or more) of the following video clips:

    Peter Mansbridge at the Aga Khan Museum

    Adrienne Clarkson - Prize for Global Citizenship

    Chat with Adrienne Clarkson

    Ask students to identify what they think the key teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan might be. Project/Post the actual list of his teachings and ask students to compare their thoughts to the actual list.

    Teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan

     

    • Respect
    • Tolerance / Acceptance
    • Forgiveness
    • Unity
    • Compassion
    • Humility
    • Generosity (Charity/Alms/Time/Knowledge to assist humanity)
    • Pursuit of Enlightenment
    • Strong Ethics/Morals

     

    Key Questions for Discussion:

     

    • Have you been exposed to or taught any of these traits before? When? In what context?
    • What do these traits mean?
    • Why are these traits important?

     

    Pairs > Call and Response: The Teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan

    Divide students into pairs and ask them to label themselves A and B. Create groups of three as needed. Ask pairs to choose one trait from the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan. Invite student A to create a movement that represents their chosen word (This is the Call section of the movement). Student B then performs a movement in response to A’s movement. Tell students that all of these movements are improvised. It is being used to create movement vocabulary. Encourage students to play with contrasting shapes, levels, energy and relationship (See Appendix A: Elements of Dance). Teacher prompt: What elements of dance (e.g., movements, levels, pathways) would best communicate the meaning of your word/idea? While reflecting on your word (trait) what shapes come to mind and think of how you can translate these ideas into movement? If the trait could move what would the movement look like? Tell students to repeat this partner call and response six times and then freeze in a final stable shape with two feet on the floor. As they move, tell them to discover a movement/gesture that captures their word best. When they have found that movement/gesture encourage them to repeat it.

    Extension

    Have pairs repeat this call and response again, but this time half the class sits while the other half improvises. Students may repeat what they did before or they could play and introduce new shapes.

    Whole Class > Tableau

    Review the concept of tableau. Explain to students that the goal is to create whole class tableau.

    Review with the class the look-fors/success criteria for an effective Tableau. See Appendix B - Success Criteria for an Effective Group Tableau. Divide the class in half and have them make two lines facing each other at opposite ends of the space. One by one students will enter the space and create their gesture. Remind students to choose movements that they can sustain and encourage them to make quick adjustments, if necessary. This activity is improvised and no order is created. Encourage students to use their periphery and sense each other as they enter the space. It should be one at a time. Remind them that they are exploring the element of relationship and encourage students to contrast each other’s shape choices and react to one another’s movements. Teacher prompt: How can you play with dancers to objects, opposition,  emotional connections between dancers? When all students have entered the space the group tableau is created. Ask students to increase the tension created in their bodies and allow them a moment to expand/and grow their movement and hold it for 5-4-3-2-1. Ask them in unison to speak their character trait word out loud. Note: Voices should be in unison.  Play with volume here-increase and decrease.  Move around the space and tap individuals on the shoulder and have them speak their words individually.

    Connections

    For resources on building an astrolabe see the following websites: http://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/way-stars-build-your-own-astrolabe-0 and https://in-the-sky.org/astrolabe. STEAM related activity and can be further looked into based on the teacher’s prerogative.

    Additional resources:

    The Ismaili, The Aga Khan Development Network

    Differentiation

    Depending on students’ prior knowledge, you may choose to complete all of the introductory activities (e.g. Build Your Own Astrolabe, Ladder of Inference, Teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan etc.) or only some of them. Alternately, these activities may be set up as a choice board or jigsaw activity and students may be offered the choice of which activity they would like to do and then report back to classmates who made different choices.

    Assessment for learning

    Ensure students have a solid understanding of these concepts before moving on to the next lesson. Anecdotal notes and “visual anecdotals” (e.g. video and pictures) may be used to document students’ work during the creative process. Criteria for working though the creative process may be co-created with students prior to beginning these movement activities.

    Consolidation

    Whole Class > Debrief

    Invite the class to reflect on their experiences.

    Key Questions for Discussion:

     

    • How did you use the elements of dance to communicate your chosen word from the teachings?
    • How did your movements and/or gestures reflect your personal thoughts?
    • Was there a particular element you found you used more than the others? Why or why not?
    • How is using improvisation more challenging than creating a movement sequence? How is it easier?
    • What did you like or dislike about using call and response as a structure for movement?

     

    Connections

    The final reflection may also be done as an exit card or a journal writing activity. Some students may prefer to discuss with a partner or audio record their ideas.

    Assessment as learning

    Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning.

    Lesson 2 – Embodying the Astrolabe

    Lesson Overview

    Estimated Time:  3-4 periods

    Subject:  Grade 7 & 8

    In this lesson, the students will further build upon their knowledge of the astrolabe and will be given more historical information. They will explore the astrolabe and through story telling create movement pieces that tell the astrolabe’s journey. They will make connections to Indigenous Teachings (the Seven Sacred Teachings): Wisdom, Love, Respect, Courage, Honesty, Humility, and Truth and the connection to the teachings of the Aga Khan: Tolerance, Acceptance, Strong Ethics/Morals, Compassion (helping the weak), Unity, Generosity, Forgiveness, Respect and the Pursuit of Enlightenment

    Curriculum Expectations

    Dance

    Creating and Presenting

    A1.3 use theme and variations in a variety of ways when creating dance pieces (e.g., create a simple movement phrase [theme] and then repeat it in modified form [variation] using choreographic manipulations [retrograding the original phrase, facing another dancer, adding more dancers]

    A1.4 use the elements of dance and choreographic forms (e.g., pattern forms, narrative forms) to communicate a variety of themes or moods (e.g., use entrances or exits to communicate beginnings or endings; use a recurring sequence of movements to signal a particular mood or character; use canon form for emphasis                                       

    Reflecting, Responding and Analysing

    A2.1 construct personal interpretations of the messages in their own and others’ dance pieces, including messages about issues relevant to their community and/or the world (e.g., dance pieces on topics such as urban sprawl, land claims, poverty, homophobia, homelessness),

    and communicate their responses in a variety of ways (e.g., through writing, class discussion, oral reports, song, drama, visual art)

    A2.2 analyse, using dance vocabulary, their own and others’ dance pieces to identify the elements of dance and the choreographic forms used in them and explain how they help communicate meaning (e.g., use of crouching shapes low to the ground and bound energy communicates the idea of confined space; use of site-specific locations [outdoor playground] to structure a dance communicates the idea of connection to the environment)

    A2.3 identify and give examples of their strengths and areas for growth as dance creators, interpreters, and audience members

    Language Arts
    Voice

    2.2 establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience

    Word Choice

    2.3 regularly use vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions in their writing (e.g., a wide variety of adjectives and adverbs; similes, metaphors, and other rhetorical devices such as exaggeration or personification)

    Learning Goals

    At the end of this lesson, students will:

     

    • Write in role
    • Use the creative process to create a dance piece
    • Use the elements of dance (body, space, time, energy and relationship) to create a dance piece
    • Use ‘theme and variation’ as a choreographic form
    • Make connections between the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan and the Seven Sacred Teachings 

     

    Instructional Components and Context

    Readiness

    Students should have a solid understanding of the elements of dance. Familiarity with the Character Traits would be helpful.

    Terminology

    Circle wave

    Relationship

    Materials

    Chart Paper

    BLM #3: Linking Traits

    Appendix B: Sample Success Criteria

    Lesson Plan

    Minds On

    Whole Class > Think-Pair-Share

    Ask students to turn to an elbow partner for a think-pair-share. Prompt: What idea do you think was the most important from learning about his Highness the Aga Khan and his teachings?  Review with students the teachings of his Highness the Aga Khan.

    Whole Class > Circle Wave

    Ask students to stand up and create a circle and think about the shape that was created based on the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan from the previous lesson. Each student will share their movement/shape with the whole class. One person shares at a time and then one by one the movement is repeated like a wave around the circle. Challenge students to use their created astrolabe incorporating/connecting the object into their movement. Explain to students that they are exploring the element of relationship: “dancer to object”.

    Connections

    Connections

    Opportunity to connect back to learning from previous lesson (e.g. connection to astrolabe and elements of dance).

    Assessment for learning

    Ensure that students are able to create a movement independently in the circle wave prior to moving forward with the lesson.

    Action!

    Small Group/Whole Class > Seven Sacred Teachings

    Divide students into groups of five and each group receives chart paper with a sacred teaching written on it (e.g. COURAGE). As a group they brainstorm what each teaching means to them and as a group create a group definition. Each group shares their thinking with the class. As a class view the video Seven Sacred Teachings. As students watch they can add new ideas from the reading to their chart paper. Make connections to the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan (see BLM #3 Linking Traits). Discuss any new learning.

    Individual > Writing in Role: The Astrolabe Stories

    Explain to students that they will use their created astrolabes (from the previous lesson) to tell the story of the astrolabe and how it has connected people. Each student writes their story on chart paper. Encourage students to connect their writing in role to the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan and the Seven Sacred Teachings, where possible.

    Key Questions for Discussion:

    If the Astrolabe could speak…

    1. What would it say?
    2. What would it see?
    3. What would it think?

    Small Group > Moving our Stories

    Invite students to find a spot in the room and individually begin exploring movement ideas based on their writing in role. Encourage students to explore their ideas using the Elements of Dance: Body, Time, Space, Energy and Relationship. Have students create a 4 count movement sequence that communicates an idea from their writing in role.

    Put students into groups of four. Ask groups to create a 16 count core movement phrase by combining their individual 4 count movement sequence. Give students enough rehearsal time so that they are comfortable dancing this 16 count sequence.

    Explain the choreographic form Theme and Variation to students. Teacher prompt: A is the Theme - the core phrase or movement sequence and A1, A2, A3 are variations of the original phrase or movement. (e.g. if the original movement was skipping (A) the variations might be skipping with arm movements (A1), skipping backwards (A2), skipping while turning (A3) and so on). Invite groups to experiment with Theme and Variation using their created movement sequence. Encourage them to explore multiple variations before deciding which movements work best. The variations should represent how different group members interpreted the astrolabe stories. All of their chosen movements should reflect the initial idea they are trying to communicate. Each group member is responsible for creating one of the variations. E.g. If there are four members of the group, they should add 4 variations to their original phrase (A-A1-A2-A3-A4).

    Whole Class > Co-Creating Success Criteria

    Co-Create Choreography success criteria (See Appendix B Sample Success Criteria) with students to ensure they know what effective/successful choreography looks.

    Connections

    If possible, take students to the Aga Khan Museum to learn more about the history of the Astrolabe and/or invite an Indigenous Elder into the classroom to share further information about the Seven Sacred Teachings. Additional resources for the Seven Sacred Teachings: Student Manual, David Bouchard Video, The Sharing Circle

    Assessment as learning

    Co-creation of success criteria. For additional resources on Learning Goals and Success Criteria, see Growing Success Viewing Guide: Learning Goals & Success Criteria

    Assessment for learning

    Circulate and ensure the students are checking success criteria and give feedback related to success criteria, as needed.

    Consolidation

    Whole Class > Sharing of Dance Pieces

    One at a time, groups share their theme and variation dance piece. Allow the class to give feedback on dance pieces related to the success criteria as time allows.

    Individual > Homework

    Ask students to bring in a newspaper article, political cartoon, editorial etc. that discusses the issue of diversity. This could be something around how the media presents a particular culture or religion, the current travel ban in the United States, issues at Standing Rock, Transphobia and the controversy surrounding gender-neutral washrooms etc.

    Connections

    Assessment of learning

    Students are evaluated using the co-created success criteria.

    Lesson 3 – Exploring Diversity

    Lesson Overview

    Estimated Time:  3-4 periods

    Subject: Grade 7 & 8

    This lesson hopes to solidify the importance of teaching character traits and how in a diverse society, these traits/teachings are the constant road to a better world. Furthermore, students will be given the opportunity to reflect upon diversity and create a short monologue. This monologue will then be integrated with their movement work from the previous lesson.

    Curriculum Expectations

    Drama

    Reflecting, Responding and Analyzing

    B3. Connections Beyond the Classroom

    B3.1: outline the responsibilities of a variety of leadership and support roles in drama, including the skills and knowledge required, and evaluate their experiences in these roles in different contexts

    B3.2: identify skills they have acquired through drama activities and explain how they can contribute to success beyond the classroom

    B1. Creating and Presenting

    B1.1: engage actively in drama exploration and role play, with a focus on examining multiple perspectives related to current issues, themes, and relationships from a wide variety of sources and diverse communities

    B1.2: demonstrate an understanding of the elements of drama by selecting and combining several elements and conventions to create dramatic effects

    B1.3: plan and shape the direction of the drama by working with others, both in and out of role, to generate ideas and explore multiple perspectives

    B2. Reflecting, Responding and Analysing

    B2.1: construct personal interpretations of drama works, connecting drama issues and themes to social concerns at both the local and global level

    B2.2: evaluate, using drama terminology, how effectively drama works and shared drama experiences use the elements of drama to engage the audience and communicate a theme or message 

    Writing

    Voice

    2.2: establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience

    Media

    Making Inferences/ Interpreting Messages

    1.2: interpret increasingly complex or difficult media texts, using overt and implied messages as evidence for their interpretations

    Point of View

    1.5: demonstrate understanding that different media texts reflect different points of view (e.g., compare pictures of the same character and/or event in media texts aimed at different audiences and identify the different perspectives represented) 

    Learning Goals

    At the end of this lesson, students will:

     

    • engage in activities (ie. Corridor of Voices) in order to physically, cognitively and emotionally connect with performance utilizing the lens of differing opinions
    • write and perform a monologue
    • identify the importance of a ‘Safe Space’ and ways in which to create one
    • identify examples of how the media attempts to influence our thoughts and ultimately our behaviours

    Instructional Components and Context

    Readiness

    Students will need to have had experience working with monologues prior to this lesson. Some additional resources for monologues can be found in the “Connections” section of this lesson. Students should understand what diversity is and have experience discussing current events.

    Terminology

    Monologue

    Corridor of Voices

    Materials

    Projector and Screen/Computer connected with Internet

    Ladder of Inference

    Lesson Plan

    Minds On

    Small Group > Discussion

    Teacher divides the class into small groups and asks them to share the article/image/cartoon etc. that they brought in with their group members and discuss.

    Key Questions for Discussion:

     

    • What issue is being presented in the article/image/cartoon etc.?
    • What is diversity?
    • How do your issues relate to diversity?
    • How does your medium (e.g. article, cartoon etc.) depict the issue?
    • How does diversity cause tension?
    • How does diversity create richer communities?

     

    Connections

    Link back to the Seven Sacred Teachings and the teachings of His Highness the Aga Khan. What values from these teachings are being represented in the various current events? What teachings are missing? If we were to practice these teachings every day, how might this reduce or eliminate some of the negativity or negative conflict in our society?

    Assessment for learning

    Circulate as students are working and listen in on conversations.

    Action!

    Whole Class > Corridor of Voices

    Explain to students that they will be creating a corridor of voices to explore the ideas from their discussion about diversity. Ensure that students have an understanding of safe space while working in role (e.g. why is a safe space important, what type of language do we use, different between in role and out of role, right to pass, importance of debrief). Arrange students into two lines facing each other and explain to the students they represent voices in society. Select one student to be a member of society who will move through the “corridor”. The other members begin to voice their opinion/concerns/thoughts. The first time the student walks through the Corridor of Voices, ask the students forming “the corridor” to say a word, thought, phrases etc. about how diversity creates tension. The student then walks through “the corridor” a second time. This time the students say something about how diversity creates richer communities. Remind them to draw on their current events and discussion from the Minds On section. Debrief the corridor of voices activity with students.

    Key Questions for Discussion
    • What did you hear/say?
    • Were there one or two things that really stood out for you?
    • How did it make you feel?
    • Did you hear phrases or themes that were similar to what you were saying?
    • How can Corridor of Voices be used to explore thoughts/feeling about a particular topic?
    • Why do you think it is important to debrief these types of drama activities out of role?

    Whole Class > Monologue

    Ask students to create a monologue which encapsulates one or few of the themes discussed over the past few lessons (e.g. His Highness the Aga Khan’s teachings, Seven Sacred Teachings, issues around diversity, history of the astrolabe). Students may wish to use the Ladder of Inference to help organize their thoughts. (See Connections section for further resources on monologue writing). Co-construct criteria for evaluation with students. (See Assessment section below for resources). Give students time to write and rehearse their monologues with able opportunity to give and receive feedback from peers.

    Small Group > Monologue and Dance Pieces

    Ask students to meet in their choreography groups (from Lesson 2) and rehearse their theme and variation choreography. Invite each group to combine their choreography and a short section from their monologues that the resonates with them. Students rehearse the best way to integrate the text and the movement. (e.g. the speaker may step out of the choreography to speak - the energy of the dancer’s movements should change to a slower and more sustained quality as the focus is now on the words of the speaker; and/or the text may be spoken as the dancers are moving).

    Connections

    To help guide students through the monologue writing process, you may wish to reference the following resources: Objects of Character Mini Monologue,  Making Meaningful Monologues,

    Assessment for, as and of learning:  

    To assist with guiding students through co-creating success criteria for the monologues, you may wish to refer to the following resources: Monologue Performance Rubric, Mini-Monologue Rubric, Rubric for Monologue Presentation.

    Students are given ample time for self/peer and teacher feedback prior to the final performance. Final performance evaluated using co-constructed criteria.

    Consolidation

    Individual > Reflection

    Students may complete the following reflection as an exit card or journal reflection.

    Key Questions for Discussion

     

    • Is there a teaching from His Highness the Aga Khan or the Seven Sacred Teachings that really resonated with you? Why?
    • How did the drama and dance strategies we used help you interpret the ideas from these teachings and communicate an idea?
    • How can drama and dance be used to explore, challenge and shift your own and other’s point of view?

     

    Connections

    Some students may wish to complete the reflection orally or using talk to text technology such as VoiceThread.

    Assessment as learning

    Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning.