Animal Survival - Drama and the Environment

Unit Overview

Context:

This unit should be taught after the Science and Technology unit Understanding Life Systems: Growth and Changes in Animals. This unit explores how and why animals become extinct and what people can do to help save endangered species. It challenges the students to think about ways that they can make people aware of this important issue.

Summary:

In this unit, students will use drama to explore the issue of endangered animals. Using role play, students will assume the roles of animal experts and communicate their knowledge of the issues facing endangered animals. Students will use drama conventions such as tableau, frozen sculpture, hot seating, writing in role and choral reading to explore this issue.  Their learning will culminate in a Awareness Campaign presentation that communicates a message about the need to care for animals.

Expectations

Creating and Presenting:  apply the creative process (see pages 19-22) to dramatic play and process drama, using the elements and conventions of drama to communicate feelings, ideas, and stories

Reflecting, Responding, and Analysing: apply the critical analysis process (see pages 23-28) to communicate feelings, ideas, and understandings in response to a variety of drama works and experiences

Unit Guiding Questions

How do we speak when in role?
Why is questioning an important tool in drama?
Why is it important to inform others of the dangers facing animals?

Lesson Guiding Questions

Lesson 1: Story Drama of Endangered Animals
What are some rules to follow in order to have a good conversation?
Lesson 2: Observing Animals
What strategies can you use when observing? 
Lesson 3: Interviewing in Role
What are good questions to ask at an interview? 
Lesson 4: Writing in Role
How do we persuade others through writing?
Lesson 5: Working with the Organization
How can we use our voices to effectively get a message across to an audience?

 

Assessment and Evaluation: How will students demonstrate their learning?

Assessment of learning

Culminating Performance Activity

1. Students will be evaluated for their work in the Awareness Campaign presentations using the Role Play Rubric.
Assessment for Learning

Four Checkpoints and Rubrics

Check Point #1/Lesson 1

Role Play Rubric with formative feedback

Check Point #2/Lesson 2

Peer Feedback/Two Stars and a Wish

Check Point #3/Lesson 3

Exit Card Reflections

Check Point #4/Lesson 4

Check Point #5/Lesson 5

 

Unit Lessons: How will assessment and instruction be organized for learning?

Approx. Duration 1 class=70 minutes
Lesson 1

Story Drama of Endangered Animals

Students will be introduced to role play.  Students will be helping an Advertising Agent create an Awareness Campaign about endangered species. Students will demonstrate their prior knowledge of the topic, and will create a gallery of extinct animals. They will then work in pairs to create a poster to make people aware of extinction.  
1 class
Lesson 2

Observing Animals

Students will play observation games in preparation for making detailed observations of animals. They will record their observations through illustrations and then discuss other ways in which they could record these details about endangered species. Students will create a gallery of frozen sculptures representing various animals and tour the gallery, providing constructive feedback to their peers on their drama work.
1 class
Lesson 3

Interviewing in Role

Students, in role as animal experts, will prepare to be interviewed by the advertising agency, who needs to know more about animals and their basic needs for survival.  In small groups, students will prepare the questions to be asked. In pairs, they will conduct the interviews and report their findings to the whole group. Out of role, the students will debrief the interview process.
1 class
Lesson 4

Writing in Role

Students will play a chasing game that introduces the concept of animals and their predators. This leads to a discussion of the various reasons for animal extinction. The students will complete a writing in role activity in which they sum up their qualifications to work for this animal rights organization. They will share their written work with the whole group through an oral reading activity. Finally, they will decide what should happen next in the drama to help create awareness about animal conservation.
1 class
Lesson 5

Working with the Organization

Teacher in role will announce that all the students have been successful in their applications to the organization. They will now develop an Awareness Campaign for radio, using a poem about extinction. They will share their poems orally with the group. Students will brainstorm and participate in extension activities to continue the work of the Awareness Campaign.
1 class
Total Lessons
5 classes
Lesson 1: Story Drama of Endangered Animals

Critical Learning

Guiding Questions

In this lesson, students will work with others to  learn about the issue of endangered species.  Students will assume the roles of animal experts and respond appropriately in role as they begin to explore how drama can be used to examine an issue.

How do we know someone is speaking in role?

What are some rules to follow in order to have a good conversation?

How do we use what is learned in role to shape or plan the future of the drama?

Curriculum Expectations

Learning Goals

B1.3: plan and shape the direction of a dramatic play or role play, building on their own and others' ideas both in and out of role.
B2.1: express thoughts, feelings and ideas about drama experiences and performances in a variety of ways.
Science: Understanding Life Systems

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to

  • adopt a role
  • listen and respond to others in role
  • co-operate with others to complete problem solving tasks

Instructional Components

Readiness

From their learning in Science, students should be aware of the basic needs of living things and of the growth and changes in animals. Students should be able to work with others cooperatively and follow directions.

Terminology

Endangered
Extinct
Campaign
Role Play
Teacher in Role
Tableau
Environmentalists

Materials

Job descriptions relating to animals written on cue cards
Chart paper
Markers
Pencil crayons
Folders
Illustrations of extinct animals
A dictionary
Blank paper or poster paper
BLM #1 Atom
BLM #2 Role Play Rubric

 

Approximately 25 minutes

Minds On

Pause and Ponder

Whole Class > Atom 

Refer to BLM #1 Atom for full instructions on the game Atom. Call out a variety of groupings (e.g. "Atom 4" or "Atom 5") and have students form groups of that number.  

Small Group > Expert Occupations

Once in groups of 4, inform students of the rules of the next activity, a game called "What's My Job?"  Ask one student from each group to approach and assign them a job written on a small cue card. All jobs will have something to do with animals such as: a zoo keeper, animal trainer, vet, animal groomer, wildlife photographer, etc.  
Have these students return to their group as experts. The others in the group will ask questions that will help them guess the expert's job.  These experts may answer questions in turn by only saying either yes, no, or maybe.  When the job has been discovered, another member of the group will go to the teacher to find out their job. The game continues until each child in the group has had the opportunity to be an expert. 
Whole Class > Discussion
When the game is over, direct a discussion about the game. Prompt: How are these jobs related?   
Assessment for Learning (AfL)

Consider reviewing key concepts from Science: Understanding Life Systems (expectations 1, 1.2).  Use observation and side coaching when students are engaged in role play. 

To prepare students to play the expert game, model the activity by becoming an expert and having children ask questions about your job.
Refer to BLM #2 Role Play Rubric when assessing students' focus and commitment to role.  Consider giving verbal feedback to students on their work.
 
Assessment as Learning (AaL)
Use the poster activity and gallery to consolidate students' learning about extinction and refer to it as necessary in future lessons.
Differentiation (DI)

Use the Atom game to achieve different groupings to include all students.

Consider having students "perform" their posters using tableau instead or in addition to drawn posters.
Quick Tip
Consider making cue cards with jobs and descriptions of those jobs to help students unfamiliar with them. 
Use samples from past awareness campaigns to give students concrete examples of what they will be making.
Link and Layer

Refer to Grade 2 Science: Understanding Life Systems (1, 1.2) when making cross-curricular connections.

Hyperlinks in this lesson

Websites for illustrations of extinct animals:

http://www.zsl.org/info/library/gallery-of-extinct-species,13,PS.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extinct_mammals

Environmental Ad Campaigns

Approximately 30 minutes

Action!

Whole Class > Role Play
Inform students that they will take on their roles as experts for a large group role play. Enter as teacher in role as an advertising executive in an agency.  Ask students if they have seen commercials or posters about recycling, saving baby seals, or other environmental issues. Explain that these are part of awareness campaigns that make people aware of an important problem that needs to be solved.
Discuss any campaigns students know and/or show examples of past campaigns (see Hyperlinks). Inform these experts that their help is needed in creating a new awareness campaign for a client. This client is from a wildlife organization and they would like to have input from scientists and environmentalists for their future advertising campaigns.  Before they ask for this help, they want to be assured that students have a good understanding of the current situation affecting animals. They also want to know that the quality of the work produced meets a high standard. 
Small Groups > Observing Animals
Play another version of the Atom game from the Minds On section of the lesson.  Call out either Atom 4 or Atom 5.  With the students in groups, provide each group with a folder with pictures of animals that are extinct (the pictures can be taken from the websites provided in the Hyperlinks section).  Have students examine the pictures to find out what is common amongst all of the animals.  Have students report their observations and record their observations on chart paper for all to see.  
Whole Class > Discussion
Facilitate a discussion based on the points recorded and guide the discussion by asking some of the following questions.  Prompts: Do any of the animals in the illustrations seem familiar to you? Have you ever seen any of the animals alive in a zoo?

Emphasize or highlight the fact that no one has seen these animals because they are endangered and/or extinct.  Ask the students to help define these words and record the definitions on the chart paper.  Consider using a dictionary to help students define the words.

Ask the students for their ideas about how or why animals become endangered and extinct. These ideas should also be recorded on another sheet of chart paper. Activate students' prior knowledge of the basic needs of animals and record these on the chart paper as well.  Prompt: How might the lack of these basic needs contribute to the extinction of certain species of animals?

Place the illustrations and the chart paper on the wall to create a gallery of extinct animals.

Approximately 40 minutes

Consolidation

Whole Class > Poster Creation
Have students create posters that will make people aware of the concept of extinction and what it means.  This poster will help with the awareness campaign. Co-create a list of criteria that each poster should have (e.g. variety of shapes, overlapping of objects, a clear message, etc.) 
Have students form small groups of 2 or 3 (consider playing another round of Atom to form groupings) for their poster creations.  When completed, add posters to the gallery wall.
Extension Activity: Have students create a tableau version of their posters.  This may include narration that states the headline and slogan of their posters.
Lesson 2: Observing Animals

Critical Learning

Guiding Questions

In this lesson, students will discuss and practice observation strategies.  They will apply their learning about extinct animals to living animals and represent these animals in different ways (through illustration and tableau) focusing on specific details. Students will observe and respond to each others' work, with a focus on giving positive feedback.

What strategies can you use when observing?
What details are important when documenting an animal?
Why is it important to document extinct animals for future generations?

Curriculum Expectations

Learning Goals

B1.3: plan and shape the direction of a dramatic play or role play, building on their own and others' ideas both in and out of role.
B2.1: express thoughts, feelings and ideas about drama experiences and performances in a variety of ways.

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to

  • use their observation skills
  • document what they know about living animals through illustration and tableau
  • share their work and respond appropriately to others' work

Instructional Components

Readiness

Students should have familiarity with the Atom game from Lesson 1.  Students should be familiar with a variety of animals from the unit Growth and Changes in Animals from Science.  Students should have some familiarity with tableau work and should know the elements of an effective tableau (e.g. stillness, facial expression, etc.)

Terminology

Frozen Sculptures
Two Stars and a Wish
 

Materials

A variety of everyday objects
Models or photographs of animals from the Growth and Changes in Animals Science unit
Blank paper
Coloured pencils
Crayons
Markers
Chart paper
Pencils and erasers
Animals (e.g., meal worms, etc.), models or pictures of animals already studied

 

Approximately 20 minutes

Minds On

Pause and Ponder

Pairs > Observation Game

Arrange a number of objects (10 to 12) on a tray or table. Inform students that this game will test their observation skills.  Let students observe the display of objects for two minutes. Then, cover the display and have students, in pairs, work to name all the objects that have been hidden. When students have finished guessing, uncover the display and have students determine how correct they were.

Pairs > Change Game

Call out Atom 2 and have students form pairs and choose roles of A or B. Have As and Bs stand facing each other in two rows.  The As are to examine their partners in the opposite row so that they know all they can about them.
When this is done, have the As turn around and face a wall while the Bs make a change about their appearance (e.g. they could untie a shoelace or move a watch to another arm, etc.). When the Bs have made the change, the As turn around and face their partners and try to guess what change was made.  After this, the Bs study their partners and then turn around so that the As can make their change.  A possible extension is to have the students increase the number of changes with each round (e.g. two changes, three changes, etc.)

Whole Class > Reflection

Debrief the activities with students.  Prompts: What have we learned about observation by doing these activities?  What skills did you need to have to be successful in these activities? What strategies did you use to help you?

Assessment for Learning (AfL)
Review learning about extinct animals from Lesson 1 as well as the success criteria of an effective tableau.
Circulate during the lesson and encourage students to use observation strategies in their work.
Assessment as Learning (AaL)
Using a signal, have students pause during the activity and observe and comment on their successes or challenges in the activity.
Have students respond to each other's drama work using the Two Stars and a Wish strategy (one positive comment, one wish for future work). 
Differentiation (DI)
Use modelling to assist students in their sculpture creation.  For example, ask two volunteers to sculpt each other into animals while the class observes. Practice giving feedback by inviting students to respond to the volunteers' work.
Quick Tip
Instead of having students touch each other during the sculpture activity, have them use verbal coaching or mirroring (one takes a shape, the other follows) to make their sculptures. Consider playing music during the activity and gallery tours.
Link and Layer
Build on previous learning in visual art and science when students are completing their sculptures and illustrations.
Consider taking students on a field trip to a museum or science centre to see representations of different species. 
Hyperlinks
Approximately 40 minutes

Action!

Small Group > Tour of the Gallery of Extinct Animals

Arrange students into groups of four. Direct students to examine the pictures on the gallery wall and utilize the observation skills that they demonstrated in the observation activities. As the students examine the pictures, notice that some pictures are illustrations and not photographs. Prompt: Why is this the case?  Explain that the artist tried to capture the way the animal looked so we would remember it.

Small Group > Animals on Verge of Extinction

Discuss animals that could become extinct in the future (see Hyperlinks). Present students with models or photographs of the animals. Explain that these animals might become extinct one day, and it is important that we record what they look like for future generations.

Individual > Drawing the Animals 

Allow the students a few minutes to examine the animal model or drawing before removing them or turning them over.  Remind them to use the observation strategies discussed in the Minds On section of the lesson when looking for details in the models.  Have students work independently to create illustrations of the animals. They should keep in mind that they should include as many details as possible in case the animal is never seen again. After several moments, have them re-examine the original stimulus briefly to determine what details might still need to be included in the illustrations.  When the illustrations are complete, have students record a short description of their animals on the back.

Pairs > Frozen Sculptures of Animals

Have students pair and examine each others' illustrations.  Ask them to appoint one person A and one B and stand opposite each other in the room, with their illustrations nearby.  Person A should take a close look at his or her illustration and then sculpt their partner into the image in that animal.  This can be done by manipulating the person's body or with verbal instructions.  Once the person is satisfied with their frozen sculpture, they change positions and B sculpts A into her or her illustration.

Whole Class > Tour of the Gallery of Living Animals

Invite As to arrange themselves around the classroom space. On a cue (such as a tambourine, or countdown) have them form their sculptures of living animals, making sure to keep still and concentrated.  Have Bs tour the space, observing the living animals.
When finished, have As tour the gallery of their partners.  Invite groups to give feedback based on their observations using the Two Stars and a Wish strategy.
Approximately 20 minutes

Consolidation

Whole Class > Debrief Discussion

Lead a whole class discussion of the activity.
Key Questions for Discussion:
What elements did you see depicted in the sculptures (e.g. stillness, facial expression, etc)?
How closely did your sculpture resemble your illustration?
Why is it important to document animals that are no longer living or those that might go extinct?
Where might you see these representations? (e.g. at museum exhibits, galleries, etc.)
What other ways can we document animals of the past and/or present?
What can we learn from the stories of animals who are extinct?
Post the illustrations of the living animals to the gallery wall for future reference.
Lesson 3: Interviewing in Role

Critical Learning

Guiding Questions

Students will maintain a role and contribute in role when conducting hot seating interviews of wildlife organization workers.  Students will generate different types of questions to elicit different types of answers and use these questions to conduct and report back on their interviews.

What does an interviewer do?
What are good questions to ask at an interview?
How do we elicit needed information when interviewing someone in role?

Curriculum Expectations

Learning Goals

B1.2: demonstrate an understanding of the element of role by communicating thoughts, feelings and perspectives appropriate to the role being played.

B2.1: express thoughts, feelings and ideas about drama experiences and performances in a variety of ways.

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to

  • bring further commitment to the role and respond appropriately in role
  • understand how questioning in role can deepen the drama

Instructional Components

Readiness

Students should be aware of what an interview is and understand the difference between statements and questions. Students should understand that different questions will require different types of answers and different types of thinking.  Students should be able to work cooperatively within a group and take on different roles within the group (e.g. leader, mediator, etc.)

Terminology

Hot Seating
Exit Card

Materials

Blank paper
Pencils and erasers

 

Approximately 20 minutes

Minds On

Pause and Ponder

Pairs > Word Association

Have students form pairs and assign roles A and B.  Person A begins by saying a word (e.g. "snow") and then B says a word that is somehow associated to that word (e.g. "cold," "winter" etc.).  Person A then responds with a word associated to what B has said.  Students do not need to give a reason for their words, as it should be whatever they associate with the word.
Extension: Have partners respond to words with words that have no association whatsoever (e.g. "snow" might result in a response of "popcorn").  Or, increase the number of people in each group.
Assessment for Learning (AfL)
Review different types of questions and answers before engaging in hot seating interviews.
Encourage students to use the anchor chart of questions when they are conducting their interviews.
Use the Role Play Rubric (BLM #2) when observing students during the hot seating interviews.  Provide feedback as necessary.
Assessment as Learning (AaL)
Have peers observe and comment on each others' role play during the hot seating interviews. 
Collect students' exit cards to gauge their learning during the lesson.  Provide feedback and share responses in the next lesson.
Differentiation (DI)
Model the word association activity from the Minds On section with a volunteer or with the whole class.
Give students the right to pass when reporting on their interviews.
Allow students to pair and conduct interviews together (i.e. two interviewers) to model good question asking.  Allow students to take on the role of note keeper instead of being interviewed. 
Allow ELL students to interview each other in their mother tongues.
Link and Layer

Make links to questions posed in different curriculum areas (i.e. science, language arts, etc.)

 

Hyperlinks

 

  
Approximately 60 minutes

Action!

Whole Class > Role Play 

Inform students that they will be participating in a large group role play as they did in Lesson 1.  Enter as teacher in role as a researcher and greet students in role as the animal experts from Lesson 1.  Inform students that a science organization wishes to have the advice of some animal experts. Show students BLM#3 Letter and explain that students will be conducting a hot seating interview of animal experts who wish to be part of the awareness campaign.  

Small Group > Preparing Questions

To help prepare for the interview process, organize the class into groups of four and have them record questions that they think might be good interview questions for someone who would like to be part of their organization.  Review types of questions: open versus closed questions, questions to elicit information, etc.

Whole Class > Sharing Questions

Have groups report back their created questions and record them on chart paper so everyone can see them. Discuss which questions are more effective and/or important than others and why. These questions might focus on the applicant's past experience, interests, etc. Sample questions might include: what experience do you have related to animals and the caring of animals? Can you define the terms endangered and extinct? What skills do you bring to this organization?
Extension: Invite the principal or vice principal into the class and have them help the students to understand what takes place during an interview.  They can give details about the setting of the room, and the nature of the questions that might be asked.  They could also help to generate and record questions to help the students.The principal or teacher should remind the students that the interviewers want more than one person to help with their organization and therefore need to keep notes on what each candidate says.  Consider modelling the taking of point form notes that might be taken during an interview.

Small Group > Interview Practice

Have students practice conducting their interviews in small groups, using the list of brainstormed questions as a guide. While the interviews are being conducted, move around the room listening to the various interviews. Look for students' skills of listening, speaking, questioning and answering in role.  Finally, prepare for the final interview by helping the students to set up the room and discussing how the interview will be conducted.  

Whole Class > Hot Seating Interview 

Have students assume the role of interviewers and take on the teacher in role as the candidate. Conduct the interview, responding to students' questions.
When the role play is ended, reflect upon the interview and highlight the most effective questions and answers.  

Pairs > Interviewing in Role

Revisit the Atom game and have students form pairs and decide who is A and who is B.  A will become the interviewer who works for the organization and B the student who wants to be part of the organization.  The interviewers should introduce themselves and start the interview process, keeping notes as needed while they hot seat their subjects.  

Whole Class > Reporting in Role

After a few minutes, stop the interview and have all of the interviewers stand. Ask each interviewer to respond in role stating one positive attribute they learned about the candidate that they thought was notable or worthy of having that person hired.  When each person has reported, ask each interviewer to find a new partner by joining one of the students who is seated. These new partners will switch roles (i.e. B is the interviewer and A is the student who wants to be hired). Continue the interviewing activity with these new partners.  
Approximately 30 minutes

Consolidation

Whole Class > Discussion

When the interviews are completed, reflect upon the interview process. Prompts: Were you able to answer all the questions posed? Did the experts sound like experts when they were being interviewed? What was the most challenging part of the interview?

Individual > Reflection Exit Cards

Have students complete an exit card recording their thoughts about the interview process using the following sentence prompts:
One question I was asked was. . .and I answered. . .
One questions I posed was. . .the answer I received was. . .
One question I wish I had posed/answered differently was. . .because. . .
One piece of information I shared about extinct animals was. . .
One thing I enjoyed about this activity was. . .
One thing I could do better next time is. . .

Collect exit cards and read before the next lesson. Provide feedback as necessary.
Lesson 4: Writing in Role

Critical Learning

Guiding Questions

Students will express their thoughts and opinions through writing in role and will share this writing with others and make suggestions for improvement.  Students will then share their writing with the class using an activity known as circle of voices.  Finally, students will brainstorm ways to use what they have learned to continue working for animal conservation. 

How do we persuade others through writing?
What suggestions can be made to improve another person's writing?
 

Curriculum Expectations

Learning Goals

B1.2: demonstrate an understanding of the element of role by communicating thoughts, feelings and perspectives appropriate to the role being played.
B1.3: plan and shape the direction of a dramatic play or role play, building on their own and others' ideas both in and out of role.
B1.4: communicate feelings and ideas to a familiar audience.

B2.1: express thoughts, feelings and ideas about drama experiences and performances in a variety of ways.

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to

  • communicate thoughts and feelings in writing
  • persuade others through writing
  • share work with others
  • follow directions and maintain a role

Instructional Components

Readiness

Arrange the classroom to provide a clear and open space, moving furniture to the side. Students should be able to listen to others and follow directions, keeping in mind rules of safety when playing games. Students should have some familiarity with writing in full sentences from a particular point of view.  Students should have some familiarity in responding to the writing of others and making improvements to their writing.

Terminology

Writing in Role
Think-Aloud

Materials

Markers
Chart paper
Pencils and erasers
BLM #4 Application
BLM #5 Writing in Role Rubric

 

Approximately 15 minutes

Minds On

Pause and Ponder

Whole Class > Deer and Wolves 

Have students partner and stand in two lines so that each person faces their partner in the cleared space.  Appoint one line the deer and the other line the wolves.  Ensure that there is a space of about two metres between the two lines.  Go over the instructions of the game.  When "deer" is called the deer turn around and touch the wall on their side of the room.  The wolves, upon hearing the word "deer" will try to lightly touch the deer on the shoulder or arm.  If a deer is touched, then it becomes a wolf and lines up with the wolves for the next round.  It the teacher calls out "wolves" then the wolves must turn around and race to touch the wall on their side of the classroom, while the deer try to touch them on the shoulder or arm.  If the wolves are touched then they become deer in the next round.
Go over rules of safety for the activity. Run the activity, varying the groups being called out at the start and then continuing to call out "deer" many times in a row.

Whole Class > Discussion

Lead a debrief discussion about the game and how it connects to the unit of study about animal survival.  Prompt: How does the game illustrate the predator/prey relationship? What may happen to the population of a species if the balance goes unchecked?
This could lead to a further discussion to determine reasons why  animals species might become extinct. Record points made on chart paper.
Key Questions for Discussion:
How does the loss of the basic needs of living things lead to extinction?
Will the loss of an animal's habitat lead to extinction? How?
How might an animal lose its habitat?(e.g. fire, flood,  humans building homes, offices, etc.)
How might disease lead to the extinction of an animal?

Could the inability to produce newborn animals and the inability to see them to adulthood lead to extinction?
Post the chart paper to the gallery wall of the classroom for future reference. 
Assessment for Learning (AfL)

Review writing in role for students before beginning this activity and consider showing models of past work.  Consider doing a model think-aloud writing in role piece for students.

Assessment as Learning (AaL)
Use peer and teacher feedback to help students make improvements to their writing in role pieces.  Consider using the Two Stars and a Wish strategy from previous lessons.
Differentiation (DI)
Make adjustments as necessary for students during writing activities, such as a think-aloud that is then scribed by a student or teacher.  Give students the right to pass when sharing writing, or encourage them to share a word or phrase rather than their entire piece.
Quick Tip
The Deer and Wolves game is best played in a large room or even outdoors. It can be played in a regular classroom with students on a carpet.  Once they leave the carpet it is as if they have touched the wall.  If there is no carpet in the classroom, use tape or chairs to mark the safe zone.  If chairs and desks need to be moved then add ten minutes in total to prepare for the game and return the classroom to its original setting.

Consider playing music during the writing activity to help students focus.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Approximately 35 minutes

Action!

Whole Class > Writing in Role

Inform students that they will be getting ready for the second part of the application process to determine if they are indeed qualified to join the organization.  The organization feels that its members need to be able to communicate well, not just orally in an interview but also in writing.  Hand out copies of BLM #4 Application.  
Guide students through the application form to make sure that all of the students understand what is being asked of them and if need be, direct them to the charts placed around the room that can provide help and possible answers. Tell them that their purpose is to persuade their audience to hire them for the job.  Give students time to write in role.

Pairs > Shared Reading

When students have completed the above written task, invite them to partner up and practice reading aloud from their writing in role form.  Ask them to provide feedback to their partners on the effectiveness of their writing.  Prompts: Would you be persuaded by this writing? Why or why not? How could this piece of writing be made even more convincing?  Give students time to make revisions to their writing as necessary.

Whole Class > Circle of Voices

Invite students to sit in a large circle with their forms face up on their laps. Inform them that they will create a circle of voices as they read aloud the answers (not the questions) from their form. They will be given a signal (e.g. light touch on the shoulder) when to read. They are to keep reading and if need be, start over again until they hear another student reading from their form. When they hear another student, they decrease the volume of their voice and within a few words stop reading. If comfortable, ask students to close their eyes and concentrate on the words and the messages heard until they are cued by the teacher. At that time, they will open their eyes and begin to read.

Begin the activity, and continue to cue students until all have had an opportunity to share.
Approximately 20 minutes

Consolidation

Whole Class > Reflection in Role

Still in role as the applicants, reflect upon the entire application process.  Prompt: Do you feel that you have the qualifications needed by the organization?  Why or why not?

Whole Class > Reflection out of Role

When out of role, have students consider what they learned from this activity and what they think might be done next in the drama to help with the mission of saving the animals.

Collect writing in role pieces and provide feedback to students using BLM #5 Writing in Role Rubric. Consider posting them around the room for others to read.

Lesson 5: Working with the Organization

Critical Learning

Guiding Questions

Students will create a presentation as part of the Awareness Campaign to communicate a message about caring for animals.  Students will use the creative process to build their choral reading presentations and will share them with an audience. Finally, students will brainstorm ways to continue the Awareness Campaign and participate in extension activities.

How do we respond appropriately to another group's presentation?

How do we use our voices to effectively get a message across to others?

How does a group arrive at a consensus of ideas?

Curriculum Expectations

Learning Goals

Creating and Presenting:  apply the creative process (see pages 19-22) to dramatic play and process drama, using the elements and conventions of drama to communicate feelings, ideas, and stories

Reflecting, Responding, and Analysing:  apply the critical analysis process (see pages 23-28) to communicate feelings, ideas, and understandings in response to a variety of drama works and experiences
B3.1 identify and describe a variety of drama and theatre forms they experience in their home, school, and community, and in the media

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to

  • create a choral reading of a text
  • use the creative process to create dramatic work
  • view and respond appropriately to others' drama work.

Instructional Components

Readiness

Lessons 1-4.
Students should be able to work within a group to complete a task and be familiar with the creative process when building a drama work.

Terminology

Choral Reading
Public Service Announcement/Commercial
Creative Process
Round

Materials

Blank paper
Pencils or thin markers
Chant on chart paper or blackboard
Art supplies (erasers, scissors, glue, construction paper, poster paper, lined paper, chart paper)
Computer with microphone
BLM #6 Poem for Choral Reading

 

Approximately 20 minutes

Minds On

Pause and Ponder

Whole Class > Gallery Walk

Announce to the class that everyone has been successful in the application process and the organization is looking forward to working with the group. In fact, the organization would like everyone to take part in its first initiative. Before the initiative is outlined to the class, invite students to take a gallery walk and revisit all of the work that they have done (e.g. illustrations of the extinct animals, posters, charts) posted on the classroom walls.

Whole Class > Brainstorm

As a class, brainstorm a list of the best ways to make adults and others in the community aware of the plight of animals on the endangered list. Brainstorm a list of ways that we can communicate information with others (e.g. public service announcements, assemblies, commercials). Record ideas as they are listed.

Focus on the concept of public service advertisements.  Prompts: Are these kind of advertisements similar to commercials? What examples are you familiar with? What makes a commercial memorable? Why might these be an effective way of educating others about an issue?
Assessment of Learning (AoL)
Use the Role Play Rubric (BLM #2) to evaluate students' performance in the role play throughout the unit.
Consider using the Writing in Role Rubric (BLM #5) to evaluate students' polished writing in role pieces.
Differentiation (DI)
Consider making mixed ability groupings for the choral reading presentations.
Give students options for creating their radio commercials (i.e. live action, recording) and their extension activities so that they can pursue their own interests. 
Choose to use the whole poem or just one verse, depending on the skill level of the class.

Link and Layer
Consider bringing in a guest speaker, such as a animal rights advocate or animal health worker to speak to students. Consider taking students on a field trip to a zoo or animal sanctuary.
Consider mailing the writing in role letters students write to a public service organization that works with animals.
Hyperlinks
Approximately 30 minutes

Action!

Whole Class > Creating an Awareness Campaign

Announce to the group that the organization is happy with the work everyone has been doing and would like the students to help them in creating an awareness campaign for their cause.  It will be comprised of a radio commercial that features a variety of chants that could be used to persuade others to think about taking care of animals.
Share the poem that they will be using for their radio commercials (see BLM #6 Poem for Choral Reading).

Individual > Choral Reading

Have students read the poem (or verse) twice out loud in their normal voices. Ask students how the poem could be read in different ways (e.g. whispered, shouted, sad voice, excited voice, fast or slow voice, etc.)  Record these different qualities on chart paper and then have students try out the different qualities as they read aloud. They might even try and put the words to a tune that they all know and sing it in a round.

Small Group > Creating a Choral Reading Presentation

Form students in to small groups using the Atom game from previous lessons.  Each group will create its own radio commercial using some or all of the  words of the poem.  Their message will highlight the animals' plight and make people aware of the issue and what they can do about it.

Guide students through the creative process as they build their presentations.  They may need some help counting syllables or vowel sounds before changing words in the poem. Multiple verses may be used and students may put the words to a tune that they all are familiar with and can sing.

Whole Class > Choral Reading Presentations

Have students present their radio commercials to the rest of the class. Consider recording their commercials using a microphone with a computer program (e.g. Audacity) and playing it back to the audience.  After each presentation, have students explain the reasons behind their creative choices and invite audience members to respond with feedback.
Consider presenting radio commercials to another class or other adults available in the school setting, such as a principal, vice principal, or teacher-librarian. 
Approximately 20 minutes

Consolidation

Whole Class > Planning for Future Campaigns

Brainstorm ways that the Awareness campaign could continue and record suggestions on chart paper.  Some suggestions may include television commercials, posters, assemblies, etc.
Extension Activities:
Writing in Role: Have students put their suggestions in a letter to the organization.  They should include their ideas as to what the next initiative or campaign should be to bring awareness to people in the community. Have students write in role as their animal experts urging the organization to carry on its momentum. It is not enough to just make people aware of the situation. Action needs to be taken!
Posters: Have students design posters raising awareness of the issues explored in class. Use art materials to create posters and post them around the school and community.  Consider having students create their posters using tableau and then take photographs of the tableaux and use them as the basis for their posters.